Agile & specifically scrum generate maximum benefit when they include the full chain of value delivery. This includes testing, deployment AND maintenance. Plus anything else that makes sense to include in the Scrum Team(s) to optimize value delivery. So when you are trying to use Scrum or other Agile approaches and want to get the most out of it; take a holistic, systemic approach. Discover your Value Chains or Customer Journeys and aim for Teams that can develop, deliver & sustain the needs of the customers you seek to serve.

Speaking of customers, in general the only people & activities we might want to exclude from our Scrum Team are actual use(rs) of our Product (or service). So we do not include customers and other Stakeholders in the team. We do however very much need to include those in the tight feedback loops, for instance in Refinement activities, Sprint Reviews and where needed, during our development.

Lately there is an uptick in articles comparing agile to devops, pegging agile approaches as ‘development’ approaches. Those agile examples are not realizing the maximum benefit nor the intended goal of agile. One could even say when doing agile only in development is more fragile than agile. Especially when we become complacent and accept this is the maximum added benefit we can get from our agile approach. As a reaction to these fragile implementations of agile, there is always a new flavor of the month we ‘should’ focus on; devops, bizdevops, devsecops, bizuxdevops and <insert new combination of business units here>. The benefit is that these concepts may help break down barriers and silos that prevent us from having fast, maximally useful feedback.

Be mindful though, that if we want to generate a maximum benefit of using Scrum and/or other Agile approaches; those SHOULD encompasses all stages and skills necessary to deliver and sustain a product (or service).

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